Time Management & The Waking-Up Routine

September 27, 2019

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TIME MANAGEMENT & THE WAKING-UP ROUTINE: (Sounds almost like a band name. Lol.) It is essential that we are active participants in our waking-up routine. Every day has an awakening. Don’t let it be by accident. I can’t stress this enough: how we wake up sets the pace for our entire life. Wanna get more sh*t done? Wanna be happier? Healthier? Train yourself to wake up better. Try much harder to not push snooze. Instead, go to bed 8-24 min earlier (I’m hoping you’ll see the ridiculousness of such as both pushing snooze for 8-24 min is just as silly as thinking going to bed 8-24 min earlier the night before will do the trick…it’s more likely that at least an hour more of sleep is needed. I recommend going to bed earlier. No one sleeps better by pushing snooze, it’s only delaying the inevitable). Try not to look at things like social media, the news, etc until you’ve at least stood up out of bed and drank some water. I recommend a full glass of water, even before coffee. I also highly recommend stretching for 2-5 minutes. I promise you’ll feel better if done regularly. The point is to prioritize your health. Don’t waste precious time upon waking. You don’t get any of this time back. Once it’s gone, it is gone forever. If you have kids, pets or other responsibilities, get up a few minutes earlier. Otherwise, you will just be reacting to everything that comes at you, which is almost impossible for any human to effectively manage day-in and day-out. Instead, be proactive. Prioritize YOU. Much can be accomplished within that first hour upon waking. It’s a habit, a routine, that can be improved just like anything else. Optimize! Maximize! #bssbbooks #austinpersonaltrainer #austinpersonaltraining #morningroutine #morningritual #morningroutines #timemanagement #morningflow #blueskystrongbox

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Dr. Tabata + HIIT Training

September 18, 2019

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Ever heard of HIIT Training? It stands for High Intensity Interval Training. Ever heard of Tabatas? They are repeated 20second work intervals followed by 10second rest intervals. They are named after the Japanese doctor Izumi Tabata who in 1996 published a now-famous study of high intensity intervals that he performed on 14 elite athletes. Unfortunately, it has been interpreted in ways that have often been used to blindly justify high intensity training for “everyone”. This was perhaps wrong? Even with the young, elite athletes in his study, progress stalled after 3 weeks. Sadly, popular culture now believes that all lower intensity exercise has little to no value. It’s not that high intensity exercise is necessarily bad, or bad for “everyone”, it’s more that it should be used appropriately. Everything has value and naturally also limitations. It’s important to use the correct tool for the correct job. Heart diseases is the number 1 killer of men & women in the United States. Sedentary folks need to ease into exercising. Starting off with High Intensity Intervals is probably a really bad idea until the body adapts to lower intensity exercise first! For some, high intervals may never be safe or appropriate. It doesn’t mean that improving fitness, health or body composition will never be possible. It only means a different path may be required. (This video shows Joel JAMIESON being interviewed. He is a very respected, experienced, educated Strength & Conditioning Coach and author.) #bssbbooks #austinpersonaltrainer #austinpersonaltraining #highintensityworkout #hiitworkout #tabataworkout #drtabata #blueskystrongbox

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…more thoughts on Resting Heart Rate & Heart Rate Zone training

September 7, 2019

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You don’t need to own a heart rate monitor to exercise effectively. That is a myth. With that said, I do think monitoring heart rate has value. Just know that you can absolutely gauge most any exercise of any type by the way you feel while doing it. This is often referred as the Talk Test. If you can easily talk, the exercise is considered lower-intensity. If you can’t, it’s more intense. Obviously, there is plenty of room in between. Don’t make the mistake of thinking all exercise need be intense to be effective. It’s not just about burning as many calories in one session as possible, it’s also about sustainability. In other words, can you repeat this for a long time to come without quitting? The average person quits exercise within the first six months. I would argue that the average American needs more lower-intensity exercise… done more often. I’m talking about something like dedicated Walking most days of the week. It’s great if someone does some form of really intense exercise once or twice a week (if they are healthy enough to to so) but not if the other 5 days are all rest days. Move more often, even if it’s low-intensity. Adequate DAILY movement is always the correct choice. Our bodies were made to move. Walking is the best choice, that is why we have legs. Aim for a goal of lowering your resting heart rate by the end of the year. (For healthy heart rate zones, Google: “karvonen formula calculator”). If you really want to do higher-intensity (HIIT) exercise, try getting your resting heart rate UNDER 60 before doing so if possible. Consult with a medical professional if you have any specific concerns or conditions. #bssbbooks #restingheartrate #walkingasexercise #austinpersonaltrainer #austinpersonaltraining #blueskystrongbox

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Resting Heart Rate is important…

September 7, 2019

 

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RESTING HEART RATE. This number can say quite a bit about health and fitness. Keep in mind, it doesn’t say everything. It is pretty easy to check. You can download a free app and check it using your phone. The best time to check it is obviously while RESTING. Lol. So first thing in the morning is best (before sitting up) or lie down for 2-5 minutes then check it. Check it for a few days, or even a week. Just get an average. Don’t overthink it. The goal is to get this number under 60. It’s ok if it’s not. The average person is in the 70’s. You could be higher. How do you get this number down? Get better rest. Exercise regularly but not too hard or too long. For most folks, I recommend daily walks for 30minutes. 1-2 weekly resistance training sessions (45min max). Get a minimum of 7 hours each night of quality rest. Avoid unnecessary stress whenever possible (this one may be the most challenging but worth the effort.) PS if you want to do intense HIIT exercise, i highly recommend getting that number down as quickly as possible by doing lower intensity work for a while. #bssbbooks #restingheartrate #austinpersonaltrainer #austinpersonaltraining #blueskystrongbox

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Thoughts on Jumprope

August 20, 2019

 

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When was the last time you tried to JUMPROPE? It’s probably been a while right? Skipping rope is a legitimate skill that requires practice. It’s not easy in the beginning and does take time but worth the effort. I consider Jumping Rope to be what I call a “fountain of youth” exercise. This would be anything that preserves or builds back movement abilities that we tend to lose quickly with inactivity and aging. The ability to run, hop and jump might seem trivial but it’s the difference between being a “spring chicken” or “old beef jerky”. Jumping Rope is an excellent way to put some “pep back in your step”. It’s also an excellent way to burn some extra calories and improve your conditioning, aka “cardio”. 5-10 minutes is typically all that most can handle in the beginning. It’s ok. Most folks won’t be able to last but about 20 jumps before resting. Some less. You may hit your feet every time the first few tries. That’s ok. Don’t quit. Any effort is good effort. Another thing I really like is that it keeps us on our toes, literally. Crashing down on the heals of the feet is not typically desirable. People often do this while jogging on concrete. This combined with poor running form literally destroys most people’s knees, feet and ankles. Jumprope is a great way to teach the body to absorb force using the calves, the body’s naturally shock absorbers. #bssbbooks #blueskystrongbox #jumprope #healthandfitness

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January 23, 2015

Ideas for a better warmup:
THE “Old” WARMUP (5-15min): Most people just hop on a treadmill or stationary bike for anywhere from 5-20 minutes to “warmup”. This works but it’s most likely not as effective as other options. Guys who plan on lifting “heavy” weights often ONLY warmup by doing light warmup-sets of their chosen exercise(s) for the day. Again, this also works but considering the fact that most of us know we need more stretching in our lives, including at least a few simple stretches in the warmup might be more optimal. Often guys are also scared to stretch before they lift because, “rumor has it”, you won’t get as big and strong. While it may be true that doing a marathon stretching session before lifting might be counterproductive for some, including other “types” of stretching has proven to actually increase strength & performance when done correctly. Lastly, some folks do their “cardio” first before lifting “weights”, i would assume in hopes of losing some unwanted body fat. Again, this is probably not the best idea UNLESS you are primarily seeking to increase your endurance for a specific event, competition or occupation. But for everyone else, i don’t recommend it. Ever, really. Normally, too much “cardio” before “lifting weights” interferes with… you guessed it, the weights. (And just to clarify, “weights”, “lifting”, “lifting weights” “strength machines”, “strength training”, “resistance training”, “body weight training”, “calisthenics”, “hard yoga”, “hard pilates”, etc are ALL basically the same thing!) “The primary purpose of resistance training is to get stronger, and for some, also build muscle. Both these things can also indirectly aid with fat loss. But keep in mind, getting stronger and building muscle both require INTENSITY to get the desired results. So don’t empty your fuel tank too early by doing too much in the warmup. If your goal is fat-loss, getting stronger or packing on more muscle, try including a short, intense 10-minute “interval session” after “weights” (aka “a finisher”). I’d also recommend doing your longer “cardio” workouts or group classes on another day, all by themselves, if you have the time available.

THE “New” WARMUP (5-10) So here we go. Here are some new things to try as your “warmup”. First and foremost, correct breathing is essential and often overlooked. This means breathing deeply from your diaphragm, through your nose. Keep this in mind as you warmup and proceed to the rest of your workout. I often tell people to do all movements at a pace that allows you sync your breathing with each repeat of that movement. Start your warmup by massaging some of the major muscles regions (back, legs, hips, calves) with a Foam Roller. (This is what most professional athletes do.)Most gyms have them. Walmart, Target, Amazon, etc all sell them for $30 or less). Then do a few safe Dynamic Stretches (aka “moving stretches”). Google this. Then perform a few easy body-weight warmup movements, focusing on stabilizing your spine and moving your many joints about (especially the hip & arm sockets). To summarize, you could very quickly Foam Roll 2-3 major areas of your body, do 2-3 full body stretches and 2-3 major body-weight movements (easy pushups, easy pulling & easy squatting), and be done in less than 10 minutes. You could even include 1-2 “core” exercises near the end or even devote some of the time to practice a new exercise (with no weight or a light weight) that maybe needs some practice. If you really want to hit everything, perform all the primitive movement patterns every time you warmup. (Check out any of Mark Verstegen’s Books). Research all this stuff! Educate yourself. It’s free. Keep things simple. Many things could work. Just keep this in mind, the purpose of a “warmup” is to get you prepared/ramped-up for the harder work ahead, not beat you done prematurely. The key is always to maximize your time, this should include not wasting any precious time doing useless sh*t during a warmup. You may want extend your warmup longer if you are sore or dealing with an injury, have specific “corrective exercises” you know you need to include, it’s really cold outside or you just woke up. We all know we need to stretch more, etc. Include these type things in your warmup and you can always get a lot done in each session, regardless of time. Density is the key.
– Carlton

p.s. Keep things simple. Always. I know i mentioned a lot of things, and that was just the silly warmup. lol. The reality is that the details of exercise and programming can easily start to bog any mind down. So don’t let it. Start by including just one new thing next time your workout. Build on that over time. The point is to move more, move better. There will probably never be a “perfect” way. And while some will waste time searching tirelessly for that, you should be out there getting work done. Time is of the essence. Ask for help if you need it. Work hard. Play hard. Enjoy.


New Weekly Tipz! This is a longer video (15 min or so) but a good video for anyone thinking about exercising while at work or while traveling. I go over some basics of what you need to know, things to consider, basic equipment and how to organize quick workouts that are very effective. Just so you know, you don’t have to watch the whole thing in one sitting. It’s ok to break it up. And by all means, feel free to recommend it to anyone you think might benefit from it.

July 29, 2013

New Weekly Tipz! Today i talk about 5 things that i get asked about a lot. Things like “should i do cardio before or after resistance training?” and other common questions. I try to keep it short and brief, for me anyway. Spread the love.

September 24, 2012

(Interval Training) 3 Problems with Fat Burning Workouts

January 21, 2011

December 7th, 2010

(Alwyn Cosgrove:) Here’s a guest article from fat loss expert, Craig Ballantyne:

3 Problems with Fat Burning Workouts

While interval training is better than cardio, “generic” interval training is not as good as *they* make it out to be.

Seriously.

By *they*, I mean the brand new trainers and generic fitness magazines who don’t really know what they are talking about.

In fact, the advice they’ll give you can cause a LOT of problems with your interval training — including the BIG 3 I’m about to share with you…

After all, you’re probably already doing some form of interval training, but what kind of RESULTS are you getting?

Are you truly enjoying your workouts?

And when is the last time you did an interval training workout where you thought ‘wow, that was really fun’?”

Trust me, you CAN have fun, fast, proven, and powerful interval training workouts. I’ll show you how in a second, but first…

The 3 Problems With Interval Training

1) Intervals can stop working if you do the same workout over & over

Yes, you MUST switch up your interval training every 4-6 weeks.

If you continue to do the same interval workout, you’re results will slow down.

So if you’re doing intervals and you’re stuck at a fat loss plateau, then it is time for a new interval workout.

2) Intervals can be dangerous if you don’t know w hat you are doing

Jumping into an advanced interval program on the treadmill or with kettlebells is a bad idea. That’s why you need to start safely.

However, most people don’t realize that even beginners can do interval training if they get a professionally designed program.

Fortunately, there are beginner interval workouts in the new 31 Interval Training Workouts manual and holiday home fat burning workout package.

3) You don’t know what else to do for intervals

Okay, great, now you know that you need to do a different interval program every 4 weeks, but what are you to do?

Well, the great news is that there are dozens and dozens of ways to do intervals. You can do the 30-60 method, Adrenaline intervals, Tabatas, and even aerobic intervals (perfect for runners who want fat loss).

(PLUS, you’re about to discover the power of bodyweight cardio circuit training. A strange name, for sure, but a powerful way to burn fat at home WITHOUT equipment.)

There is absolutely no reason you should ever be bored of interval training or wondering what type of intervals you should do next.

BUT WAIT…One more problem: You don’t have any fancy equipment

Most people think you need a treadmill or bike to do interval workouts, but that can’t be further from the truth.

In the 31 Interval Training Workouts manual, you’ll discover how to do intervals with kettlebells, hill sprints, and even bodyweight exercises (including a NEW bodyweight cardio 5×5 circuit).

In fact, I’ve spent the entire spring of 2010 in my Turbulence Training lab creating the Ultimate Interval Training Guide, featuring over 31 different interval workouts and replacements…

…including NO-equipment bodyweight cardio circuits, kettlebell intervals and “ladders”, hill sprint workouts, and much, much more.

And then I followed that up with more time in the lab to create the “TT Bodyweight Cardio” program, without using any equipment!

I then combined those two programs along with an extra special workout for you to create the COMPLETE Holiday Fat Burning Workout package.

=> Holiday Fat Burning Workout

(But hurry, this offer is only available until Thursday.)

With these workouts you’ll have the exact prescription for fast fat loss from intervals. No more of that generic “get on the treadmill and then go fast and then go slow” advice you get from uneducated members at the gym or at work.

This is the real deal.

You’ll soon be boosting your metabolism with proven, powerful interval training workouts from one of the first trainers to introduce fat loss intervals to the world.

I’ve been using and preaching intervals and bodyweight exercises for over 13 years now, and having trained thousand of clients – in person and online – I know exactly what works.

Fixing intervals to help you lose fat fast,

Craig Ballantyne, CSCS, MS
Men’s Health Contributer


The Art Of Masculine Fat Loss (The EDT Fat Loss Solution: Lose 1/2% Fat Per Week With NO Dietary Changes!) By Alwyn Cosgrove and Charles Staley

January 21, 2011

Since the inception of the Escalating Density Training system, one of the most common inquiries we receive at the office is “When are you going to write about EDT for fat loss?”

How about right now?

As it turns out, EDT is perhaps the simplest and most effective training technique available for body composition training. I was recently talking to my colleague Alwyn Cosgrove, owner of Results Fitness Training in Newhall, California has been using EDT-inspired training programs to facilitate rapid losses in bodyfat with his clients for several months now.

In fact, Alwyn claims an average loss of 2% bodyfat per month with no dietary changes at all. However, there is a price to be paid for quick results, and this program does exact a heavy toll. Cosgrove joking refers to it as “Rambo training” it’s not for wussies. I agree, but at the same time, this is about as fun as hard work can be. Have a look:

The Program

This EDT cycle is simple, brief and yet quite brutal. You’ll perform (3) 15-Minute “PR Zones” (Personal Record Zones) where you’ll attempt to accumulate as many total reps as possible and then improve upon that number every workout (see “EDT Loading Parameters” for more details).

Each and every workout you know how long it’ll last and you also know exactly what you need to accomplish. It’s that simple. Here’s your program, make exercise substitutions if equipment or injury restrictions warrant.

Monday

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Chins
A-2: Hack Squat

Rest: 5 Minutes

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Rows
A-2: Seated Leg Curl

Rest: 5 Minutes

Third PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Overhead Press Machine
A-2: Incline Board Sit-Ups

Wednesday

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Dips
A-2: Back Extension

Rest: 5 Minutes

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Incline Press Machine
A-2: Leg Extension

Rest: 5 Minutes

Third PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Flat Dumbbell Bench Press
A-2: Reverse Trunk Twist on Ball

Friday

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Dumbbell Deadlift
A-2: Push Press

Rest: 5 Minutes

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Preacher Curl
A-2: Lying Dumbbell Triceps Extension

Rest: 5 Minutes

Third PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A-1: Standing Lateral Raise
A-2: Prone Ball Roll

COSGROVE: Note that you can also reduce the rest periods between PR zones thereby further increasing the density. I also prefer to have a bigger rep “buffer.” In regular EDT, I allow 20% more reps before I increase the loads.

In Fat Loss EDT, I don’t increase the loads until you perform 30% more reps. I think the higher volume helps with fat loss (this assumes a good load selection initially). Another rule I use is that the eccentric phase should be controlled, the concentric should be accelerative.

EDT Loading Parameters

For those not yet familiar with EDT’s unique loading parameters, here’s the nuts and bolts:

Escalating Density Training is based on the concept of doing more and more work from workout to workout. Therefore, it’s critical that your exercise biomechanics (i.e., technique) is consistent on every workout. If you perform strict curls on one workout and loose form the next, you aren’t really doing more work (for the arms at least!)

* I recommend 10-15 minutes of light to moderate cardio, followed by 10-15 minutes of light stretching on ìoffî days for the purpose of promoting active recovery and reducing soreness.

* Each workout in this cycle consists of (3) PR Zones of 15-minutes duration separated by a short (5-minute) rest periods. In each PR Zone, you’ll generally perform two exercises, for a total of 3-4 exercises per workout.

* In each PR Zone, you’ll typically perform two antagonistic exercises in alternating fashion, back and forth, using the same weight for all sets, until the PR Zone has elapsed.

* After warming up the first exercise(s), select a load that approximates a 10RM for each exercise. Ideally, the weight used for each exercise should be equally difficult.

Sets/Reps/Rest Intervals: This is where EDT is truly unique. Most people will find it most productive to do higher repetition (but not maximal effort) sets and shorter rests at the beginning, and then gradually progress to fewer reps per set and longer rest intervals as fatigue accumulates.

As an example, you might begin by performing sets of 5 with very short (10-15 second) rests. As you begin to fatigue, you’ll increase your rest intervals as you drop down to sets of 4, then 2, and as the time limit approaches, you might crank out a few singles in an effort of accomplish as many repetitions as possible in the time allotted.

NOTE: Do not perform early sets to failure, or even near failure. My recommended starting point is to do 1/2 of what is possible (e.g., 5 reps with a 10RM weight) at the beginning of the time frame. As the time limit approaches however, you’ll find yourself working at or near failure as you attempt to break your rep record.

Progression: Each time you repeat the workout; your objective is to simply perform more total repetitions in the same time frame. As soon as you can increase the total number of reps by 20 percent or more, start the next workout with 5 percent more weight and start over. Similarly, if you manage to improve upon your last performance (for the same workout) by 40 percent, then you’ll increase your weights by 10 percent on the next workout.

PROGRESS ACCELERATION TIPS:

I like amino acids as the post workout meal – an hour later I have a shake with fiber when training for fat loss.

Aerobics: avoid like the plague – they cause you to lose muscle, and they help you to become more efficient at burning fat. So how would you like your fat burning machinery to get smaller and more efficient when you are trying to lose fat ? Thought so.

For the EXTREME RAMBO HARDCORE ADDICT: Do EDT using hybrid lifts – see below. Another very cool yet brutal tip is to do TWO 15 min periods in the workout but perform TWO EDT workouts per day. Brutal but it’ll carve you up.

Day One:

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A1 Alternating max lunge
A2 Seated Cable Rows

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
B1 Step Up
B2 Push up-prone tuck combo

Third PR Zone (15 Minutes)
C1 DB Squat and Press
C2 Close Grip Pulldown

Day Two:

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A1 Bulgarian Split Squat
A2 Push Press

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
B1 SHELC
B2 Seated Row to neck

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
C1 Good morning squat hybrid
C2 Incline Db Press

Day Three :

First PR Zone (15 Minutes)
A1 Deadlift
A2 Pullover

Second PR Zone (15 Minutes)
B1 Lateral Lunge and touch
B2 Arnold Press

Third PR Zone (15 Minutes)
C1 DB Swiss Ball Crunch
C2 Bent Over DB Row

Fuel For EDT

To maximize the effectiveness of this EDT fat-loss program, employ the following nutritional strategies:

1) Reduce consumption of refined carbohydrate (breads, pastas, white rice, potatoes, grains, cakes, cookies, etc.) to a bare minimum, especially later in the day.

2) Virtually all meals should contain a fiber source, expect for post-workout meals, which should ideally be a fast-absorbing protein/carb shake. Check out a cool product called Fiber Smart. This is a unique, dietary fiber made from flax seeds and other top quality ingredients to support proper function and health. It also contains Acidophilus and Bifidus to promote a health bacterial balance and amino acids to support a healthy digestive lining.

2) Eat every 3 hours for a total of 5 to 6 meals per day. No exceptions. Schedule meals as if they were appointments with yourself, because that’s what they really are when you think about it.

3) Calculate or estimate your lean body mass (total weight – fat weight) and eat one gram of animal-source protein per pound of lean bodyweight per day, divided into 5 or 6 meals. For an individual who weighs 200 pounds and is 15% body fat, this would mean 170 grams per day, which would equate to 5 meals containing 34 grams of protein per meal.

4) Hydrate! My recommended water intake is 60 percent of your bodyweight in pounds, converted to ounces, per day. For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, drink 90 ounces of water per day.

5) Watch out for “hidden” sources of fat and sodium such as various salad dressings and condiments.

6) Educate yourself on the caloric value of what you eat. If you’re not losing weight (fat) you’ll need to eat slightly less calories, and/or increase caloric expenditure (via exercise). There may be some trial and error at first as you learn more about how many calories you’ll need to create an energy deficit. COSGROVE: this is key. Violate this rule and you are toast.

7) Develop strategies to cope with difficult situations, such as family get-togethers and going out to eat. COSGROVE: Fast food? Yesó it’s called grilled chicken sandwich. Fries, no.

8) Virtually all breakfast cereals are to be avoided – they almost always contain high levels of calories, sugar and non-existent protein and fiber content – the worst possible type of food. COSGROVE: the only cereal you can have is oatmeal. Nothing else.

9) Some saturated fat is OK, but it’s easy to take in more than you realize – be careful with salad dressings, condiments, grilled meats, fried foods, Chinese food, gravies, etc.

10) Stop analyzing everything to death and get down to basics – it’s not that difficult to figure out how to eat right. Which brings us to…

11) Staley on “simplexity”: OK, let’s get down to brass tacks here – EAT LESS! I’m often asked about the fat loss value of various foods like grapefruit, cider vinegar, etc. My patented response is “Any food will make you lose weight- if you eat too little of it.”

A little trick is in order here – the next time you feel hungry, instead of giving in to it and feeling deprived, tell yourself “OK- this is good – it’s a sign that I’m doing the right thing.” Trick yourself into believing that being hungry is desirable.

12) Here’s what Cosgrove has to say about cheating:

If you cheat: DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT change your next meal. I see many clients who overeat at one meal and then under eat at the next meal as a kind of “payback.” All you did now was screw up TWO meals.

If you cheat: get right back on track. A lot of people think after cheating – I’ve blown it – so I might as well REALLY blow it! Let me ask you – if you get a flat tire do you get out of your car and slash the other three? Hey, you have a flat tire – might as well have four, right?

13) Cosgrove on hunger: Hunger is a sign that your body is lacking in energy. At this point your body will use stored fat as a fuel source. It’s a good thing. While I agree with Dr. Eric Serrano that calories are not created equal – it’s tough to argue that eating less calories will cause anything other than weight loss. It’s the law of thermodynamics.

About The Author

Charles Staley…world-class strength/performance coach…his colleagues call him an iconoclast, a visionary, a rule-breaker. His clients call him “The Secret Weapon” for his ability to see what other coaches miss. Charles calls himself a “geek” who struggled in Phys Ed throughout school. Whatever you call him, Charles’ methods are ahead of their time and quickly produce serious results.

Click here to visit Charles’ site and grab your 5 FREE videos that will show you how to literally FORCE your body to build muscle, lose fat and gain strength with “Escalating Density Training,” Charles’ revolutionary, time-saving approach to lifting that focuses on performance NOT pain.

Lear more here ==> http://hulsestrength.com/recommends/EDTTraining


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